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Disclaimer: CME certification for these activities has expired. All information is pertinent to the timeframe in which it was released.


Cardiac Resynchronization: Novel Therapy for the Failing Heart


GOAL
To provide current information about the role of resynchronization therapy for congestive cardiomyopathy to clinicians who treat patients with heart failure.

TARGET AUDIENCE
This activity is designed for electrophysiologists, interventional radiologists, interventional cardiologists, cardiologists, heart failure physicians, and physicians and nurses in cardiac catheterization laboratories. No prerequisites required.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing take responsibility for the content, quality and scientific integrity of this CE activity. At the conclusion of this activity, the participant should be able to:

  • Understand the basic pathophysiology of congestive cardiomyopathy.
  • Describe the concept of cardiac resynchronization therapy.
  • Describe the techniques available for left ventricular pacing and the optimal site for such.
  • Understand the results of clinical trials performed to evaluate the risks and benefits of resynchronization therapy.
  • Understand the current indications for resynchronization therapy.
  • Understand the potential economic impact of resynchronization therapy.

ACCREDITATION STATEMENT
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to sponsor continuing medical education for physicians.

The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing education in nursing by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

CREDIT DESIGNATION STATEMENT
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 3.5 category 1 credits toward the AMA Physician's Recognition Award. Each physician should claim only those credits that he/she actually spent in the activity.

The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing designates this activity for a maximum of 3.5 contact hours.

The estimated time to complete this educational activity: 3.5 hours.

Release date: August 15, 2003. Expiration date: August 15, 2005.

DISCLAIMER STATEMENT
The opinions and recommendations expressed by faculty and other experts whose input is included in this program are their own. This enduring material is produced for educational purposes only. Use of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing names implies review of educational format, design, and approach. Please review the complete prescribing information of specific drugs or combinations of drugs, including indications, contraindications, warnings, and adverse effects, before administering pharmacologic therapy to patients.

This program is supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Guidant Corporation.

Advanced Studies in Medicine (ISSN-1530-3004) is published by Galen Publishing, a division of Advanced Studies in Medicine, an HMG Company. PO Box 340, Somerville, NJ 08876. (908) 253-9001. Copyright ©2003 by Galen Publishing. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, without first obtaining permission from the publisher. Advanced Studies in Medicine is a registered trademark of The Healthcare Media Group, LLC.

Full Disclosure Policy Affecting CME Activities:
As sponsors accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), it is the policy of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing to require the disclosure of the existence of any significant financial interest or any other relationship a faculty member or a sponsor has with the manufacturer(s) of any commercial product(s) discussed in an educational presentation. Detailed disclosure may be found on the CD-ROM.

FACULTY ADVISORS

    Jeffrey A. Brinker, MD, FACC
    Professor of Medicine and Radiology
    Departments of Medicine and Radiology
    Division of Cardiology
    Johns Hopkins University
    School of Medicine
    Baltimore, Maryland
    • Dr Brinker reports having no financial or advisor relationships with corporate organizations related to this activity.

    Gary Gerstenblith, MD
    Professor
    Department of Medicine
    Division of Cardiology
    Johns Hopkins University
    School of Medicine
    Baltimore, Maryland
    • Dr Gerstenblith reports having received honorarium from Guidant Corporation.

Notice:
In accordance with the ACCME Standards for Commercial Support, the audience is advised that one or more articles in this continuing medical education activity may contain reference(s) to unlabeled or unapproved uses of drugs or devices.

Faculty have indicated that they have not referenced unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices.

Heart failure is rapidly becoming one of the most prevalent cardiovascular disorders. According to the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), more than 61 million Americans have one or more types of cardiovascular disease. Of these, more than 4.7 million have been diagnosed with heart failure, and more than 550,000 new cases are reported annually. In addition, heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly.

The prevalence of heart failure is projected to increase markedly over the next decade. Nearly 1,000,000 heart failure patients are discharged from the hospital annually, and 30% of patients on drug regimens for heart failure return to the hospital within 6 months. The economic burden of managing heart failure is tremendous. In 1999, the total cost of management of heart failure approached $20 billion.

The peculiarities of the syndrome require special strategies in clinical management. Strategies may include adopting approaches for preventing heart failure and implementing new treatment modalities with proven efficacy. Therefore, it is important that physicians and other healthcare professionals examine and become familiar with the new developing technologies and therapeutic options for heart failure management. This CD-ROM will provide physicians and other healthcare professionals with the most up-to-date information, so they can make informed decisions regarding optimal therapy for heart failure management. The CD-ROM provides an excellent medium to add appropriate pathologic images, physiologic observations, and physical findings to the text.





Johns Hopkins Advanced Studies in Medicine (ISSN-1558-0334), is published by Galen Publishing, LLC, d/b/a ASiM, PO Box 340, Somerville, NJ 08876. (908) 253-9001. Copyright ©2012 by Galen Publishing. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, without first obtaining permission from the publisher. ASiM is a registered trademark of The Healthcare Media Group, LLC.