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Disclaimer: CME certification for these activities has expired. All information is pertinent to the timeframe in which it was released.


Pandemic Influenza: A Call to Action


GOAL
To provide primary care physicians with up-to-date information on preparing for an influenza epidemic.

TARGET AUDIENCE
This activity is designed for primary care physicians. No prerequisites required.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of this activity, the participant should be able to:

  • Examine the impact of seasonal and pandemic influenza on the healthcare system.
  • Identify the risk and warning signs for specific influenza epidemics/pandemics, in
    particular avian influenza.
  • Describe specific measures for the management and preparedness of an influenza pandemic.
  • Explain pandemic influenza planning and management strategies within various healthcare settings.

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine takes responsibility for the content, quality, and scientific integrity of this CME activity.

ACCREDITATION STATEMENT
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

CREDIT DESIGNATION STATEMENT
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The estimated time to complete this educational activity: 1 hour.

After reading this monograph, participants may receive credit by completing the CME test, evaluation, and receiving a score of 70% or higher.

Release date: October 15, 2007. Expiration date: October 15, 2009.

DISCLAIMER STATEMENT
The opinions and recommendations expressed by faculty and other experts whose input is included in this program are their own. This enduring material is produced for educational purposes only. Use of The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine name implies review of educational format, design, and approach. Please review the complete prescribing information of specific drugs or combinations of drugs, including indications, contraindications, warnings, and adverse effects, before administering pharmacologic therapy to patients.

This program is supported by an educational grant from Roche.

Full Disclosure Policy Affecting CME Activities
As a provider accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), it is the policy of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine to require the disclosure of the existence of any significant financial interest or any other relationship a faculty member or a provider has with the manufacturer(s) of any commercial product(s) discussed in an educational presentation.  The presenting faculty reported the following:

PROGRAM DIRECTORS

John Bartlett, MD
Professor of Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore, Maryland
Dr Bartlett reports serving as a consultant for Abbott Laboratories, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, GlaxoSmithKline, and Pfizer Inc.

Trish M. Perl, MD, MSc
Professor, Department of Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore, Maryland
Dr Perl reports serving on the speakers' bureau for MedImmune.

Thomas C. Quinn, MD, MSc
Director, Johns Hopkins Center for Global Health
Professor of Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
John Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore, Maryland
Dr Quinn reports having no financial or advisory relationships with corporate organizations related to this activity.

Notice: All faculty have indicated that they have not referenced unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices.

Johns Hopkins Advanced Studies in Medicine provides disclosure information from contributing authors, lead presenters, and participating faculty. Johns Hopkins Advanced Studies in Medicine does not provide disclosure information from authors of abstracts and poster presentations. The reader shall be advised that these contributors may or may not maintain financial relationships with pharmaceutical companies.

This Johns Hopkins Advanced Studies in Medicine monograph is a part of the Influenza Educational Initiative (IEI). Please go to the IEI Web site for additional programs within this initiative, as well as program details and resources.

Pandemic Influenza: A Call to Action
John Bartlett, MD,* Trish M. Perl, MD, MSc, and Thomas C. Quinn, MD, MSc

At the peak of each influenza season, physicians are highly aware of the impact of the disease. Hardly a day goes by without an influenza-related newspaper story. Either the Washington Post reports that seasonal influenza vaccination cuts the risk of infection in children 2 years and older,1 or a new outbreak of avian influenza H5N1 has been reported among turkeys in the United Kingdom.2

The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine conducted a consensus meeting on January 11, 2007, titled "The Influenza Educational Initiative." This meeting gathered a prestigious, multidisciplinary group of experts in pandemic influenza to establish a consensus about the processes that are necessary for hospitals, clinics, and private practices to develop a comprehensive plan to diagnose and treat patients if a pandemic influenza begins. These experts included John Bartlett, MD, Trish M. Perl, MD, MSc, and Thomas C. Quinn, MD, MSc, and other representatives from schools of medicine, medical centers, and public health agencies who are well recognized for their work in pandemic planning. After completing this issue of Johns Hopkins Advanced Studies in Medicine, physicians should be better equipped to manage patients with seasonal influenza and be able to participate more knowledgably in efforts at their workplaces to plan for a potential pandemic influenza.

REFERENCES

1.    Billingsley J. Flu shot cuts kids' infection risk in half. Washington Post. March 6, 2007.
2.    Cowell A. Deadly bird flu confirmed in British turkeys. New York Times. February 4, 2007.

*Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Director, Johns Hopkins Center for Global Health; Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Address correspondence to: John Bartlett, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Building 1830, Room 447, Infectious Diseases, 600 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287. E-mail: jb@jhmi.edu.

The content in this monograph was developed with the assistance of a medical writer. Each author had final approval of his article and all its contents.





Johns Hopkins Advanced Studies in Medicine (ISSN-1558-0334), is published by Galen Publishing, LLC, d/b/a ASiM, PO Box 340, Somerville, NJ 08876. (908) 253-9001. Copyright ©2012 by Galen Publishing. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, without first obtaining permission from the publisher. ASiM is a registered trademark of The Healthcare Media Group, LLC.